Beat it

Beat it

Youth Diabetes-Olivia's Story



by Edna Cortinas

CORPUS CHRISTI-Most children are busy listening to their I-pods or playing sports, just enjoying life as a kid. However, some have the adult responsibility of dealing with diabetes. Olivia Guerrero is one young lady who's had to have what it takes to adjust to this lifestyle.
"Checking my blood sugar, eating breakfast, taking my insulin before I eat...another blood check, lunch, another shot at lunch...dinner, a blood check, another shot, and then another different type of shot at bedtime," Guerrero told KRIS6 News.That's a typical day in the life of Olivia Guerrero, a senior at West Oso High School, who's had Type I Diabetes, since she was nine, which indicates her pancreas doesn't produce insulin.
According to The American Medical Association, the number of children developing Types I and II Diabetes is growing, with Type II Diabetes getting worse each year.
Dr. Ana Maria Paez, Pediatic Endocrinology at Driscoll Children's Hospital says, "Type II Diabetes when you take it during adolescence we don't know why those teenage years progress more aggressively but it does."
For most people a number thirteen at Whataburger is no big deal, but for someone with Diabetes it becomes a game of numbers and chance, but the responsibilities that come with being diabetic are not too bad for Olivia, especially if it means a healthier outcome.
"I'd rather go through the blood sugar checks and taking my shot and stuff rather than have something shut down on me later on or say oh I can't do this anymore because I didn't take care of myself whenever it really mattered,"Guerrero said.
Olivia's mom, Ester Sanchez, helped her as a child, but as an adult she has learned to manage on her own. However her mom does have some advice for other parents of diabetic children.
"The main thing is being informed talk to the doctors, the nurses, take the classes. You know get as much information as you can, because I mean the more you know the easier it is to deal with it," Sanchez said.
This June, just a few days after she graduates, Olivia will be a counselor at the Texas Lion's Camp. It's a camp for children with physical disabilities, type one diabetes, or cancer.
There she will serve as a role model for other kids with Diabetes. She hopes to later become a Dietician or Diabetes Educator and attend Del Mar College.