Beat it

Beat it

Combination of Aerobic Exercise helps Type 2 Diabetes Patients



Diabetes is a disease cause due to metabolic disorders in human body. Inadequate insulin production in human body may be the cause of this disease. Secondly, Human body cells may not respond properly to insulin. A diabetic patient can have both the problems. Obesity is a major risk factor for everyone. Obese people are among the first liners for diabetes risk.
Diabetes can be under control or may be prevented with the aid of Few Exercises at Home combine with proper clinical guidance.
A new study suggests that the most effective way for people with type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar levels with exercise is by combining aerobic exercises with resistance training.
Previous studies have shown the benefits of aerobic exercises, such as jogging and swimming, and resistance training (muscle strengthening or toning exercises) for people with or at high risk of type 2 diabetes.
Experts from the University of Vienna studied the effect of aerobic exercise, resistance exercise and combination of both to a human’s blood sugar control, blood pressure and blood fats.Aerobic exercise include swimming and jogging while resistance or strength exercises are mainly weight lifting and using other gym weight machines.
Published on July 2 in the journal Diabetologia, the research contains data from 14 studies that include 915 people with type 2 Diabetes and looked into the role of aerobic and strength exercises in enhancing the health of diabetics.
Findings indicate that combining the two types of exercise was more effective in controlling blood sugar, blood fats, blood pressure and weight, and even helped more people attain higher levels of good cholesterol.
Exercise is always a good choice for people battling type 2 diabetes.
“Both aerobic and resistance activity are capable of reducing blood glucose,” Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the Diabetes Management Program at the Friedman Diabetes Institute, part of Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City, explained.
He further added that different modes of exercise have different effects.
To date, no systematic review has compared the direct and indirect effects of these three different training modalities on the outcomes of blood sugar control and blood fats in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of aerobic exercise training (AET), resistance training (RT) and combined training (CT) on blood sugar control, blood pressure and blood fats in patients with type 2 diabetes in a systematic review and meta-analysis.
A total of 14 trials enrolling 915 participants were included. The results showed that, in patients with established diabetes, AET might be more effective in reducing HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control) and fasting glucose when compared with RT. CT was more powerful in reducing HbA1c compared with AET, and more effective in reducing HbA1c, fasting blood glucose and blood fats when compared with RT. However, these results could not be confirmed when only low risk of bias studies were included. Pooling both direct and indirect evidence on AET, RT and CT via meta-analysis demonstrated that CT was the most efficacious exercise intervention regarding its impact on HbA1c, fasting glucose, good cholesterol, blood fats, diastolic blood pressure and bodyweight.
The authors note that only studies where the training was supervised (and thus objectively validated) were included in the analysis. There is evidence that supervised exercise is more effective than unsupervised training, but in practice it seems unlikely that most patients would have access to supervised exercise regimens of this intensity.
 The authors say, “It is possible that either AET, RT or CT may be easier to perform effectively without supervision, thus affecting the external validity of these results since only studies with supervised training were included