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Avoiding Midnight Snacks May Help You Lose Weight



Quitting late night snacking habits may reduce the unhealthy effects of foods high in fat and sugar, according to research conducted at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The animal study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, tested a number of eating patters on 392 male lab mice over a period of 12 weeks.
Two groups of mice fed the same diet showed a disparity of health effects: the group that ate any time gained 2.5 times as much weight as those fed during 9 and 15 hour period.
The study's authors added a caveat: that eating once per week late at night would not make a difference.
"The fact that it worked no matter what the diet, and the fact that it worked over the weekend and weekdays, was a very nice surprise," says the study's lead author Amandine Chaix.
"[Time Restricted Feeding] stabilized and reversed the progression of metabolic diseases in mice with preexisting obesity and type II diabetes," the researchers team added.

"We establish clinically relevant parameters of TRF for preventing and treating obesity and metabolic disorders, including type II diabetes, hepatic steatosis, and hypercholesterolemia."