Beat it

Beat it

Insulin Resistance Linked To Cholesterol Medications



Roughly 30 million Americans live with diabetes and if you are one of those people, then a new study regarding statins could be important.
Statins are cholesterol medication, yes, but the new study indicates that statins could introduce insulin resistance.
Dr. Ronald Goldberg, the director of the Lipid Disorder Clinic and associate director of the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami, explains that the studies “show evidence that statins increased insulin resistance, and that the people who developed diabetes appeared to have less ability to respond to the insulin resistance by making more insulin.”
Obviously, this can be a problem.
Baylor College of Medicine professor, Dr. Alan Garber, also comments that statin users who have blood sugar levels that are beginning to creep up can probably stave off further development of type 2 diabetes through diet and exercise.
 The editor of the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism goes on to say, “The solution is lifestyle modification with diet and exercise. You should do that for high cholesterol, anyway. There’s no simple cure-all for all the risk factors in life. It’s clear that a single pill isn’t going to supplant individual self-management. Patients have to learn to take care of themselves.”
This suggests, then, that diabetics do not necessarily need to avoid statins, only that extra consideration should be taken when prescribing statins.
Former American Heart Association president and Professor of Medicine at University of Colorado School of Medicine, Dr. Robert Eckel, puts it this way: “It’s a good news-bad news scenario. Although there is convincing evidence that patients on statins are at increased risk of new-onset diabetes, the benefit accrued is reducing risks of heart attack, stroke, and fatal heart disease trumps the effects of being new onset diabetics